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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
be scientists. there is all this talk about we have to do the recording to the science. while the talks might begin moving at a snail's pace -- like a caravan stuck in a sandstorm. everyone seems to be breaking your neck to get far away from the sides as possible. the world is already here. and whether the u.s. or any other country, including my own andhey are living in it -- i would hope maybe their kids would turn around and tell their parents, haven't you noticed? we are already there. >> that was ronny jumeau of the seychelles. before that, you heard jonathan pershing, the chief climate change negotiator. so far, the u.s. envoy tod stern has only held one news conference after one week and half. he was goodlett told another one today, but if you look at today's list of meetings, the event is the only one marked in red. a press conference was cancelled. ronny jumeau is with us here in doha, representative of the alliance of small island states. and we are joined by martin khor, executive director of the south centre in malaysia. ambassador, you're on the panel with the jonathan pershing, t
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: house republicans today offered their counter- offer to the president's plan for a deal both sides say is needed to avoid year-end tax increases. the move was the latest volley in an increasingly tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposin
in the last five years. >> well, there have been major events. what's unusual about this event in science history is it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. it's not one technology. it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, your entire genome profile in a few hours with a few hundred dollars which took billions of dollars and a decade. we have the ability to analyze those data through very statistical computations structures and artificial intelligence. >> so if i look at it. you show me a machine that now sequences dnas, the size of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than -- much more powerful than a machine five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days, a 24/7 run, one machine could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the u.s. in the year 2007. >> you also talk about how computing has become not only faster but much more sophisticat sophisticated. >> the most exciting is artificial intelligence. we're a third artificial intelligence where computers can think. they can think in a text real way where computers can help us make d
? >> there have been major events and what's unusual about this period in science history is that it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. so it's not one technology, it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, the entire tumor profile in a few hours for a few hundred dollars what took billions of dollars and a decde aid, question have the -- >> if i look at just to understand that advance in computing. you showed me a machine that now sequences dna, it's the side of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than, much more powerful than a machine just five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days a 24/7 run, one machine, could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the united states in the year 2007. >> you also talked about how computing has become just faster, but much more sophisticated. >> we're now a third generation artificial intelligence where computers can think, they can actually think in a con tech churl way which allows us to make decisions based on vast amounts of information. game changing. >> i think we all understand, at least i t
. and for those who are unfamiliar with the term "stem" it stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. the hard sciences that we have too few in terms of graduates from our colleges and universities. this bill passed in the house of representatives with 245 votes, and was originally sponsored by my friend and colleague, lamar smith of texas, and is very similar to a piece of legislation i myself have introduced earlier this year. the goal of this legislation is one that i think is -- enjoys broad bipartisan support, and that is to help the united states retain more of the highly skilled immigrants who come to study at our colleges and universities. in particular, this bill would make eligible for a green card those who graduate in the stem fields who get a master's degree or a ph.d. and so we would not add to the net number of green cards that would be eligible, there is 55,000 diversity lottery visa green cards that would be substituted for by these stem green cards. now, we all know that america's immigration system is broken, and, unfortunately, it's a self-inflicted wound in many
grader from right here in the bay area and is now on display at the chabot space and science center in oakland. >> joining us this morning is the inventor of the eco spider... jack li ... he's a sophomore at oakland technical high school.... and melissa russo, she's the director of institutional advancement at chabot space and science center in oakland. tell us a little bit about a new exbhibit at chabot... >> i always had that idea on my mind but i never had it on paper. when the supervisor told me to enter the contest i just put it on paper. i have been trained in a lot of environmental knowledge. so i combined these elements and basically designed a robot. >> this is about the size of a fire hydrant. >> yes. basically, how does it work? >> it will roam with the street and peck up garbage. and it runs on it it would- pick up garbage and it is on multiple howar powered solar powered -- and it will pick up the garbage. and somehow it will convert that to energy and even surplus energy to the battery. >> self sustaining. >> how does it know what his car car bridge and was not? >> i w
that was done, she looks up at me and she goes, "baby! when'd you get here?" when science and medicine couldn't bring my mother back to me, these hymns, these songs of faith that she shared with me, were the things that we shared together. ♪ >> reporter: according to armstrong, the choir sings to bring glory to god. and perhaps nowhere is that more evident than in their signature song, beautiful savior, an arrangement done by christiansen. >> that i think has been a song that can epitomize and has been a model for us throughout the years, why do we do this? we sing praise to god. glory and honor, praise, adoration, now and forevermore be thine. that is the focus of our work. >> reporter: when everything falls into place, armstrong says it's a spiritual experience. ♪ >> some people go to prayer and do that, but you know, still small voices and burning bushes don't seem to work with me. you know? but in the minute when that chord locks and we've been struggling with it, and it finally works. it's as if, yeah, god is there. >> reporter: it's an experience he hopes gets transmitted to the aud
known to science. nerve gas is an old-fashioned mustard gas -- nerve gas and old fashioned mustard gas. the bodies which litter the town were those of people who ran out of their houses to try to escape the gas and then were killed out in the open. since that moment, this woman has been alone in the world. she was only a teenager then. she lost 17 relatives, including her mother, two brothers, a sister. she keeps their pictures with her all the time. >> everyone wants to live, but what kind of life for us? every day is the day of the attack. we are wounded. there are scars on our bodies. the pain is still in our hearts deep down. >> no one has ever cleaned up the cellar where her family was gassed. even 25 years later, the stench of mustard gas is still strong, strong enough to kill small creatures. it makes our eyes weep and our heads ache. no doubt about it, things have come down here -- things that have come down here seem to die as a result. it could be a good idea not to spend too much time down here. all right. what i'm doing is just -- >> a top british expert in chemical warfare
's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. we have important breaking news. nbc news is reporting u.s. officials say their worst fears have been confirmed the syrian military has loaded chemical weapons inside bombs. nbc says those same officials say bashar al assad's forces are awaiting final order to use those loaded missiles against syria's own people. this video posted online, which we can't independently verify, purports to show syrian missiles that have been modified to carry chemical and biological weapons. obviously, this is a sober development in a situation that seems to be getting worse by the day. pentagon correspondent barbara starr joins me along with cnn contributor and former cia officer bob baer and on the phone fran townsend. barbara, i know you're working to confirm this nbc report. how much would this change the situation? if u.s. military is going to act to prevent assad from gassing his own people, it would seem, if they loaded this stuff into weapons, the time to do it would be at hand. >> right now i can t
-level political science classes in college. you talk about the rationale act or model. assuming al assad is a rational actor, even if he thinks he may lose and need a place to go some day like russia or be able to live in exile somewhere, just rationally speaking, it would not make sense for him to use these weapons, would it? >> well, we have to look at the generals around him. he's not alone in this. he's not a single man making these decisions. there are a group of generals from his own promotion which are controlling this war. they are not being offered a way out. you know, and the way they look at it, i've spent a lot of time with these people. they're virtually a cult. they think their survival's at stake. even if the united states were to enter in any sort of -- you know, to go in and get the weapons, that would be a better option for them than to losing to the rebels who they consider terrorists, fundamentalists, whatever you want. and their chances are dimming by the day. and they're very desperate and they are this closed-in mentality. it's unpredictable exactly what they're go
ahead. >> reporter: this political science professor at uw called this an interesting bind for the president, saying my crens is they will look the other way, but find a couple high profile people who are well beyond the bounds of our new law and bust them, but leave everyone else completely alone. if that happens, the target could be on frank snarr, but he thinks he's just the first and more private smoking rooms will soon pop up. >> and more power to them. if they can raise revenue for the state, that's what it's all about. that's what we're in business for. >> now, the bar owner stresses the buying or selling of marijuana inside his club is strictly prohibited. >>> well, still ahead this morning, as fighting continues in syria, a new move by rebel forces to improve coordination could bring on support from the united states. >> and in london, more backlash over the death of a nurse who fell victim to a radio show prank. find out what people are saying the radio host should do now. we'll be right back. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all.
and science and technology. >> yeah, absolutely. that's one of the big things is we want to show how to do science and engineering on the show and we want to make it fun. a lot of this science shows, ten minute noose them, you fall asleep or whatever. that's one of the reasons we blow stuff up, we launch rockets, because we've got to get this next generation of kids interested in doing science engineering and math. >> brian: i still can't get through a whole episode of "electric company." steve, you remember we got in trouble for saying red neck on television? >> steve: right. >> brian: we got written up how numb we were to the people in the south. you're saying red neck is misunderstood. >> completely misunderstood. look up the history of the word. nowhere in its history was it used as derogatory term. it's only been in the last few decades that that's used on tv. in the south, it really is a term of endearment, if you think about it. it's hard work sharecroppers who had to be resourceful. everything they had was on the farm. if something broke, they had to fix it. when we moved the germa
an extension of science and technology, but i wanted to know what it meant to us, to humanity, to us then and to generations in the future, and i wasn't sure, but all i knew is that the world and the earth and the small part of the universe that i was privileged to see was not an accident, that there is a creator of this universe. and i had the opportunity, a few others have to sit on god's front porch and see a small part of it. and that's what i came home w. the science and technology is obsolete the next day, but the spirit, the meaning, and what neil just said a minute ago, it proved that period of time proved that individually and collectively as a nation we dedicate ourselves to a cause, there is nothing, nothing absolutely that we can't do. all we've got to do is decide to do it, whether it's go to the moon or solve the world crisis, forget off this financial cliff, or whatever, we have to be bold, be bold. bill: thank you, gene. really appreciate that. >> god bless. bill: check it out. job well done. check it out. fly me in the moon here on the fox news channel 9:00 eastern t
oveabout caffeine.es. the executive director of the center for science in the public interest said, "overdoing caffeine alone is actually pretty difficult to do. someone would have to make an effort to consume 40 or so 200-mg caffeine tablets." or... about this much 5-hour energy... in a single day. we recommend... not more than two per day. yeah, when we first came out with the product... you know, i made sure of one thing. if my family wasn't going to use it... if it wasn't good enough for my family if it wasn't safe for my family... i'm not gonna put it out there. i take it almost every day. and twice when i play tennis. this is our criteria that we have to be safe... if we're not willing to do it ourselves... we're not asking anybody else to do it. we're not gonna sell it. so, that's our approach to safety... that is a higher standard you can get. >> eric: house republicans moved last week on immigration reform. friday, the house passed a bill to help the high skilled foreign workers become u.s. citizens. what are the hopes to pass the senate? how far could it go to solve the i
inventive mind. for the last look. a political science professor likes to point out that in democratic nations highways are full of twists and turns to accommodate property and people. in autocratic they are straight because leaders can bulldoze whatever is in the way to get to a straight line. take a look at this interesting twist on that rule. the builders of this highway in china built their road in a straight line but as you can see the road has a house right in the middle of it. the homeowner refused to budge so they built around him. remember in the run up to the beijing olympics, the authorities tore down houses with abandon. perhaps times are changing in china. on the other hand it could be a fluke. my only remaining question is where is the family's mailbox. the answer is a, the vatican has been a permanent observer state of the u.n. since 1964. the holy sea has full rights in the body, the representative can make speeches, take part in debates. he can do anything except vote. thanks to all of you for being part of my program. i'll see you next week. >>> hello, everyone, i'm d
of his students. james crumb, a computer science teacher was starting class when a shooter broke in and assaulted crumb. more shocking the identity of the attacker. it was the teacher's own son. before 25-year-old christopher crumb had fatally stabbed his father's girlfriend at his home and he fatally stabbed his father before fatally stabbing himself. you smoke to neighbors and did the neighbors in fact tell you whether the teacher and his girlfriend, whether they were concerned, whether they had any fears, whether there are security issues? >> that's the question now is what happened to lead a son to kill his father. i spoke to a neighbor who lived directly across the street from heidi arnold and jim crumb. she said she met them last summer, that they largely kept to themselves but there were no red flags about any of this that potentially could have happened. and in a press conference with police, there weren't any red flags, i would could have been much, much worse. both of the professors are dead and there were six students in the the classroom at the time of the incident. t
, no matter what happens which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense from td ameritrade. >> eliot: i'm back with dan gross of "newsweek" and the daily beast. brian beutler and eric bates. i want to start out with the financial trend financial packs that i mentioned earlier in the show. dan, would that be a bad idea? a good idea? something that we should think about and hold in reserve for another day. >> i actually think it's a good idea. the economists say if you want something less of something tax it more. if we want less speculation and less out of control training by these crazy machines that are doing hundreds of thousands of trades a day to capture a fraction of a penny in economic gains, taxes it would discourage those and raise a fair amount of money in a fairly painless way in trading. >> eliot: would this be an useful compromise point? you want the capital markets to be liquid. you want to allocate capital efficiently among businesses and he cansectors. all of that used to happen before the hedge fund that were driven by computers. you could butt a transaction tax it on
. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done. what it free men and women can achieve when imagination joins a common purpose. host: his inaugural address from january 2009. the question is, as the president moves to a second term, what is your number one priority? the number one agenda item you think he needs to address? danny is joining us from west virginia on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the first issue and the core of all of our problems is the free trade we have been engaging in for the last 20 years. if you look at the jobs numbers and how long it takes to recover from the sessions, the clear issue is our jobs have
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? ♪ i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> welcome back, everybody, on this friday morning. the futures are still hanging in there. we're looking at the futures just slightly lower at this point. it looks like the s&p futures are down about two points below fair value but, of course, we do have the jo
, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and particularly in the early months of 2007, during the surge in iraq, i think one of the hardest decisions i made, maybe the hardest decision that i made as secretary was extending the length of deployments in iraq and afghanistan from twelve months to 15 months, and we did it for about a year and a half. and two years, and the alternative was to cut short their time at home. so if they were only to serve twelve months in the theatre then they might only be home for nine months or eight months or something, and so the recommendation of all of the generals and others was do the 15 and let them have the year at home, but there is no
there's something to find, something is alive. >> what does a 2-year-old care about science? not much but my son has so much fun exploring that he doesn't realize his brain is learning too. >>> have you ever been asked to check off one of those boxes that describes your ethnicity, you probably noticed there's a box called other. other. sort of an unusual thing to say about yourself. i'm an other. in fact, there's a young poet who is so disturbed by that, she decided to write a poem about it because for her part she said she was too light skinned for black kids she grew up around to avoid teasing and taunts and it still haunts her today. soledad o'brien has more. >> reporter: it's a poem about her life. she is struggling to recite it. >> they always called me white girl. i was never ashamed of myself until she taught me to be ashamed. she calls her poem other or the biracial poem. it's about being bullied by black kids for being light skinned. >> i remember their taunts. it took years to fade. i became ashamed. >> reporter: the tough part. she has to perform it at the first spoken word
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> john mcafee is a famous pioneer of anti-virus software but authorities in belize want to question him about the killing of his neighbor. nobody saw him until he contacted cnn's martin savage and agreed to an interview that was anything but normal. >> reporter: the search to find john mcafee started here at the airport. it began with three simple words. sorry i'm late. a prearranged code word to let me know i'd met the person that would take me to mcafee. what followed was a drive road through winding, twisting streets and then we get in to a parking lot, get in to another vehicle and drive off again. this time with switchbacks, u-turns and back alleys. clearly meant to confuse us as well as anyone following. and then, there we were. face to face. observation number one. with john afee, there's no such thing as a simple answer. you are john mcafee? >> i think so, yes. i am john mcafee. >> reporter: he seemed nervous, anxious. are you afraid? >> wou
is for science and research. the u.s. condemns the launch saying it is the same technology that would be used to launch a ballistic missile. >>> alan simpson is cutting loose gangnam style. >> stop tweeting your breakfast. >> yes, the republican from wyoming wants to convince people to get involved with lowering the national debt. he asks young americans to use social media to sign a petition. i think that's going to be a successful marketing campaign. >> he's moving like gangnam style. >> soon you'll be doing it. >> a billion people will have seen that youtube video. >>> two prominent members of congress are standing by to join us live. they're getting ready to debate how to break the stalemate in the fiscal cliff negotiations. whether republicans should declare victory on taxes and move on. or are we all going over the fiscal cliff? let's see if we can work out a deal right here in the situation room. but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. at chevy's year-end event, we have 11 vehicles that offer an epa-estimated 30 mpg highway or better. yeah? hey.
of the story is they will have more time for arts and music. our kids stink at math and science. there is no indication there is a link between this dump of federal and local money and whether results. the school system is one of the worst in the state. we gave them a free $100 million high school to motivate learning and test scores haven't changed at all. no one can connect this money with better result. isn't that the point to get smarter kids? martha: it is the point. we have seen in so many of our inner cities, the more money that gets thrown at the program over the years, we have seen a declining rate of grades and test scores. so we added more money, we are getting lower test scores. you want to make sure you will have quality in those hours. up believe the way to do that is to promote school choice which doesn't seem to be happening in this administration. >> what can do you with a few dollars for kids? before president obama became president congress passed a d.c. voucher program and was sending them to sidwell where the president's daughters go. one of the first things
california's stem cell agency has done a lot for science but more needs to be done and it can be improved. >>> tara will have the last check of your morning commute, including foggy conditions. there they are. you can't even see the sunol grade but it's there somewhere. 8:52. when we come back, "mornings on 2." 3çíño% >>> welcome back. 8:54. new details about a story we first told you about at 4:30. oakland police say eight people were arrested after the s.w.a.t. team served search warrants near 79th and macarthur overnight. they've been detained for various offenses, including illegal possessions of firearms. reportedly, a rifle and handgun were also seized. >>> we have an update on this. we told but this, an oakland hills car fire. well, the fire is out. crews are still out there on campus drive near merit college. that plume of smoke filled the air. the first call came in about 8:00 this morning. the fire department tells us no injuries have been all righted. >>> california's stem cell agency is being cite sized for how its grant money is being handed out. a newly released report fo
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. every human being is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep nuer store. the only place in the world you' find the extraordinarily comfortabl sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust your size and shape. temperature-balancing bedding. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs. each of your bodies. in the name of human individualy: the sleep number collection. discover how our sleep professionals can individualize your sleep experience. exclusively at one of our 400 sleep number stores nationde. sleep number. comfort individualized. this holiday season, give the gift that's magical: the innovative airfit adjustable pilillow at special 30% savings. now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] humana, we und
. caller: c-span could put on actual science. i think there is a lot of magical thinking on the part of democrats here. first of all, they are assuming if they raise the taxes on this one%, it will not affect the jobs and the companies that they work for. nor would it affect the customers they have. what are the percentages of the most important job creators around? how did you identify them? they had no clue. i think the other aspect of magical thinking is that in the noise and the signal, nate silver pointed out previously a 12% rise in gdp might ake for a 2% rise in employment. in 2005, we got 3.5 million jobs lost. it is a fantasy to believe that the president's spending is going to make employment rise more. recently, there has been an article by a harvard university law professor who says if you are going to do this thing, it is more important to make all the fiscal cuts them back as greece and spain know, when people do not trust your debt, weak issue too much debt. if everyone heads to the door like china and other is, our debt is really going to go up. host: should the raisi
other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. jennifer >>>> i want the people who watch our show to be able to come away armed with facts and the arguments to feel confident in their positions. i want them to have the data and i want them to have the passion. but it's also about telling them that you're put on this planet for something more! i want this show to have an impact beyond just informing. an impact that gets people to take action for themselves. as a human being that's really important. this is not just a spectator sport. [ music ] >> this is "the full court press: the bill press show," live on your radio and on current tv. >> 13 missed before the top of the hour here, meredith shiner "the roll call." you can follow her @rollcall.com or better yet on twitter twitter @meredithshiner. somebody like peter follows your tweets and let's you know what you are saying. >> peter: this is my gig. i follow tweets to bill and read them on air. i am looking to branch out. >> can you do part-time personal assistant duties? >> peter: tota
of medicinal marijuana. technicians sort, ammize and distill the plant. it's science here. and they believe it will help children with severe autism, ep department sy and cancer. >> we have seen more than one child like jayden who came to us with very, very serious, severe life threatening illnesses who as soon as they started using cannabis medicine draw a dramatic turnaround. >> reporter: the community says without better research most doctors opposed medical marijuana for children. >> all medications may have side effects, may have long-term consequences and unfortunately we know very little about this. >> the parent is flying by the seat of their pants in doing this. ♪ you are the world to me >> reporter: call him crazy, unethical, this father heard it all except for one phrase. >> all i want is my son to say i love you, dad. can you say i love you? that's all i want to hear. i'm really close. >> reporter: close to final hi reaching his son. >> washington state has a first in history moment today with the recreational use of marijuana going in to effect and also marking another first.
if there were science of axel rant used. but inside the building, there are fire investigators, police are also here on the scene. again, they consider this a suspicious fire. they're gathering and sifting through some of the evidence out here. but you can see that the restaurant, again from park to oak street is shut down to traffic. and it's going to be closed for the next hour or so while they continue the investigation. >>> we're learning more about the fan who fell from the third deck thursday night's raider's became. he's still hospitalized in serious condition with broken bones and other injuries. police have called it a deliberate act, but say it's unclear if the teenager had an understanding of the actions. a preliminary investigation revealed that the teen jumped or climbed over a wall and fell. >>> kansas city police have released two dash board videos related to the murder suicide of the chief's line backer belcher. in the first, he is asleep outside the apartment complex at 3:00 a.m. last saturday just hours before he killed his girlfriend and shot himself. police say he said he wa
.s. and the albany college of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we are in the university of albany library department of special collections archives and the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records, primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. the national colony archive was started here at the university of albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the archivists here at the department of special collections archives and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states so we set forth to establish its first death penalty archive and what we do is reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment and these individuals and organizations for the ideas that frame the debate that goes on in the legal arena and the political arena over the death penalty. what
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)